"Or do you think that you will enter Paradise while such [trial] has not yet come to you as came to those who passed on before you? They were touched by poverty and hardship and were shaken until [even their] messenger and those who believed with him said,”When is the help of Allah?” Unquestionably, the help of Allah is near."
Surah Al-Baqarah (2:214)

(Source: inyourbrilliancebask)

I often find myself posing a contradictory request to God—that He instills humility in me while saving me from humiliation.

Pride is an entangling, toxic thing. It’s to want the legacy of a saint, but without the pain.

nevver:

Hard to understand.

nevver:

Hard to understand.

letswakeupworld:

Iraqi Christian children who fled violence in Qaraqush are pictured as they arrive at a community center in Arbil, Kurdistan.

letswakeupworld:

Iraqi Christian children who fled violence in Qaraqush are pictured as they arrive at a community center in Arbil, Kurdistan.

(Source: gettyimages.com)

whoneedstransitions:

oumcartoon:

"September" by Hefnawy, from Tok Tok's 2014 calendar. 
For those who aren’t familiar with Tok Tok:

In the tumultuous three years since the Tahrir Square uprising, a number of young Egyptian cartoonists have persevered to defend a crack of space for free expression and dissent. Among their favorite slings: Tok Tok, an alt-comic magazine.
Tok Tok is more preoccupied with the country’s social issues than with the politicians of the day. Its narratives range from wordless strips on corrupt government officials and businessmen, to the misadventures of an antihero combating sexual harassment. The quarterly’s illustrations depict an Egypt largely absent in the mainstream press—downtown street corners, packed minibuses, cramped apartments, and daily addictions such as coffee or hashish. The artists challenge readers to attune themselves to the city life around them. Variously drawing on the aesthetics of Mad Magazine and Walt Disney, noir film and street art, Tok Tok captures Cairo’s grit, and is always penned in colloquial dialects. Mohammed Andeel, one of the magazine’s five co-founders, who goes only by his last name in the tradition of Egyptian cartoonists, calls Tok Tok  “an answer to censorship.”

Continue reading my profile of the comic revolutionaries in the Winter 2014 issue of the Cairo Review of Global Affairs.
Plus more posts on Tok Tok here here here here here and here.

I think someone might be mailing me an issue of Tok Tok. I wonder which issue it is…

whoneedstransitions:

oumcartoon:

"September" by Hefnawy, from Tok Tok's 2014 calendar

For those who aren’t familiar with Tok Tok:

In the tumultuous three years since the Tahrir Square uprising, a number of young Egyptian cartoonists have persevered to defend a crack of space for free expression and dissent. Among their favorite slings: Tok Tok, an alt-comic magazine.

Tok Tok is more preoccupied with the country’s social issues than with the politicians of the day. Its narratives range from wordless strips on corrupt government officials and businessmen, to the misadventures of an antihero combating sexual harassment. The quarterly’s illustrations depict an Egypt largely absent in the mainstream press—downtown street corners, packed minibuses, cramped apartments, and daily addictions such as coffee or hashish. The artists challenge readers to attune themselves to the city life around them. Variously drawing on the aesthetics of Mad Magazine and Walt Disney, noir film and street art, Tok Tok captures Cairo’s grit, and is always penned in colloquial dialects. Mohammed Andeel, one of the magazine’s five co-founders, who goes only by his last name in the tradition of Egyptian cartoonists, calls Tok Tok  “an answer to censorship.”

Continue reading my profile of the comic revolutionaries in the Winter 2014 issue of the Cairo Review of Global Affairs.

Plus more posts on Tok Tok here here here here here and here.

I think someone might be mailing me an issue of Tok Tok. I wonder which issue it is…


Lauren Bacall (1924-2014)

Lauren Bacall (1924-2014)

(Source: martinklasch.blogspot.com)

I’ve encountered so many people who have devoted their lives and time to [mis]understanding people and living vicariously through that same warped lens, that I have grown third person averse in storytelling.

I can’t bring myself to play animator when so many people have tried to breathe life that isn’t mine into me; feelings that are the byproduct of third party reactions to me and not my own. 

This is the first long weekend of 2014 where I haven’t traveled or spent an inordinate amount of time with other people, and I’ve re-discovered that the closest thing to a caffeine punch for my imagination is socialization in moderation.

Confining your brain to the warm embrace of a crowd gives it about as much room to move as a dancer confined to a table top routine — you can pop, bop, move punchily in a predictable manner that pleases a group, or you can make the empty room your medium and create something of scope, a small universe of your own. 

Currently masking extreme annoyance through my partially-inherited WASP power to stifle explosions of emotion with a look of slight discomfort and mild condescension.