ventriloquote:

A Mother Tongue and the Daughter Teacher

The teenage girl who gives Kurdish lessons, the Kurdish immigrant experience, raising a child, and all sorts of other fascinating glances into Kurdish life given to us - with fantastic photographs - by Jodi Hilton.

(via thetuqay)

ventriloquote:

A Mother Tongue and the Daughter Teacher

The teenage girl who gives Kurdish lessons, the Kurdish immigrant experience, raising a child, and all sorts of other fascinating glances into Kurdish life given to us - with fantastic photographs - by Jodi Hilton.

(via thetuqay)

simplyrav:

Kurdish traditions. Love this photo!

simplyrav:

Kurdish traditions. Love this photo!

lifeisliterallylimited:

March 16th marks the 24th anniversary of the Halabja Massacre of 1988.

1. (Sayeed Janbozorg) - two people dead (one whose face is covered by a little blanket by the photographer) and a Kurdish man, with their cat. The poisonous gas killed people instantly.

2. (Sayeed Janbozorg) - children that were killed instantly by the poisonous gas, who probably had no idea what to do or where to go.

3. Halabja cemetery.

4. (Sayeed Janbozorg) - the pain of a father having to carry his infant, running for safety. Of course, neither of them made it to safety.

5. Iraqi Kurds collect the bodies of those gassed by Saddam’s forces at Halabja

The incident, which has been officially defined as an act of genocide against the Kurdish people in Iraq, was and still remains the largest chemical weapons attack directed against a civilian-populated area in history. 
The attack, sanctioned by Saddam Hussein, indiscriminately killed between 3,200 and 5,000 Kurds, and injured around 7,000 to 10,000 more, through poisonus chemical gas. Thousands more died of complications, diseases, and birth defects in the years after the attack.

In Halabja, chemical weapons were dropped for five hours in the region. Children ran to shelter, some ran out of the town only to die halfway, mothers carrying their children in their arms, father’s rushing towards safety – there was no safe haven for them. Those who managed to escape had burnt skin, some deformed, and others diagnosed with cancer.

(x, x)

mylovepoem:

runmadamrun:

Syria.

Ah the Kurdish flag

mylovepoem:

runmadamrun:

Syria.

Ah the Kurdish flag
warwithinaframe:

A female member of the PKK. The PKK (also called the Kurdistan Worker’s Party) has fighting an armed struggle against the Turkish state with the aim of establishing a Kurdish state since 1984.
Philippe Dudouit

warwithinaframe:

A female member of the PKK. The PKK (also called the Kurdistan Worker’s Party) has fighting an armed struggle against the Turkish state with the aim of establishing a Kurdish state since 1984.

Philippe Dudouit

mylovepoem:

Mem û zîn is a Kurdish classic love story written down 1692 and is considered to be the épopée of Kurdish literature. It is the most important work of Kurdish writer and poet Ahmad Khani (1651-1707). Mam and Zin is based on a true story.For Kurds, Mam and Zin are symbols of the Kurdish people and the Kurdish country, which are separated and cannot come together.
The Mem-u Zin Mausoleum in Cizre province has become a tourist attraction.
The movie Mem û Zîn was produced in 1991 in Turkey. It was not allowed to play the story in the Kurdish language so it was first produced in Turkish. It was later translated into Kurdish.SynopsisMam, of the “Alan” clan, and Zin, of the “Botan” clan, are two star-crossed lovers. Their union is blocked by a person named Bakr of the Bakran clan. Mam eventually dies during a complicated conspiracy by Bakr. When Zin receives the news, she also dies while mourning the death of Mam at his grave. The immense grief leads to her death and she is buried next to Mam. The news of the death of Mam and Zin, spreads quickly among the people of Jazira Botan. Then Bakr’s role in the tragedy is revealed, and he takes sanctuary between the two graves. He is eventually captured and slain by the people of Jazira. A thorn bush soon grows out of Bakr’s blood, sending its roots of malice deep into the earth between the lovers’ graves, separating the two even after their death.

mylovepoem:

Mem û zîn is a Kurdish classic love story written down 1692 and is considered to be the épopée of Kurdish literature. It is the most important work of Kurdish writer and poet Ahmad Khani (1651-1707). Mam and Zin is based on a true story.

For Kurds, Mam and Zin are symbols of the Kurdish people and the Kurdish country, which are separated and cannot come together.

The Mem-u Zin Mausoleum in Cizre province has become a tourist attraction.

The movie Mem û Zîn was produced in 1991 in Turkey. It was not allowed to play the story in the Kurdish language so it was first produced in Turkish. It was later translated into Kurdish.

Synopsis
Mam, of the “Alan” clan, and Zin, of the “Botan” clan, are two star-crossed lovers. Their union is blocked by a person named Bakr of the Bakran clan. Mam eventually dies during a complicated conspiracy by Bakr. When Zin receives the news, she also dies while mourning the death of Mam at his grave. The immense grief leads to her death and she is buried next to Mam. The news of the death of Mam and Zin, spreads quickly among the people of Jazira Botan. Then Bakr’s role in the tragedy is revealed, and he takes sanctuary between the two graves. He is eventually captured and slain by the people of Jazira. A thorn bush soon grows out of Bakr’s blood, sending its roots of malice deep into the earth between the lovers’ graves, separating the two even after their death.

Kurds protest over deadly Turkey air raid →

arabstateofmind:

Angry protesters have demonstrated against the government in the Turkish city of Istanbul, after 35 people were killed in a Kurdish-dominated village in the country’s southeast by an air strike the government says mistakenly hit smugglers rather than a group of separatist fighters.

Huseyin Celik, a spokesman for the ruling Justice and Development Party, said that those killed in the strike on Thursday “were not terrorists” and that officials are now investigating possible intelligence failures which led to the incident. He expressed regret for the deaths and suggested that the government could compensate the victims.

“If it turns out to have been a mistake, a blunder, rest assured that this will not be covered up,” he told reporters, adding that it could have been an “operational accident” by the Turkish military.

The air strike prompted a protest by more than 1,000 ethnic Kurds in Istanbul, which was broken by police using tear gas and water cannon. Several hundred of the protesters had thrown stones at the police and smashed vehicles during the demonstration in the city’s main Taksim square.

Ertugrul Kurkcu, a member of parliament for the pro-Kurdish Peace and Democracy Party (BDP) that called the protest, told Al Jazeera that the air strike was an “inhuman” and “unacceptable” act, and that it was “part of the government’s crackdown project on the Kurdish movement”.

The Turkish military confirmed that its warplanes launched the strikes after unmanned drones spotted a group of people crossing the border. The military says it launched the raids because it suspected those crossing over to be PKK fighters, based on earlier intelligence that the group was planning an offensive against Turkish military bases. According to a military statement, the strikes occurred in northern Iraq in an area “where there is no civilian population, and where the [PKK] has bases”.

The BPD party has called for two days of mourning to be observed for those killed in the incident.

Some sources are saying they were just cigarette smugglers.

arabstateofmind:

An elderly Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga prays on 17 April 1991 at the grave of his son  after he buried him in Havaguizeh refugee camp during the 1991 uprising

arabstateofmind:

An elderly Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga prays on 17 April 1991 at the grave of his son after he buried him in Havaguizeh refugee camp during the 1991 uprising

arabstateofmind:

Two Iraqi Kurdish refugee children lick powdered milk off their hands in Zakho during the 1991 uprising

arabstateofmind:

Two Iraqi Kurdish refugee children lick powdered milk off their hands in Zakho during the 1991 uprising

rupertconant:

Kurdish Wedding. Arbil 1992. Photo Rupert Conant

rupertconant:

Kurdish Wedding. Arbil 1992. Photo Rupert Conant